Paris is calling. She says she booked your apartment in the 14th for this summer.

{My room with a view}

An artist’s studio should be a small space because small rooms discipline the mind and large ones distract it. –Leonardo Da Vinci

After living in a room that had at one time been a maid’s tiny quarters, I believe the word “studio” will forever conjure the sound of church bells, smells of rotisserie chicken cooking at the Saturday market beneath my window, memories of cooking experiments in tight quarters, and the odd sensation of stepping out of my shower into my kitchenette.

I don’t remember having many complaints about my tiny apartment. I always had everything I needed at my fingertips, the whole world right outside my door, and the freedom to banish any nonessential piece of junk, because there wasn’t any excuse to cram it into nine square meters.

(In case you still can’t envision the size, imagine this: I could “mop” my entire floor by stretching a wet wipe over a broom and sweeping for five minutes, and I could open my refrigerator without rising from bed.)

Often during the nine months I spent in that bright little place I remarked that I felt inordinately productive. I read and wrote a lot, and I learned everything I know about cooking (almost) on those two slightly slanted electric burners.

I really miss it.

Which is why, my friends, I encourage you to look into renting a hole-in-the-wall studio of your own for a bit. Maybe just a month. Perhaps a week or two.

And why not in Paris? Why not this summer?

It sounds like I have a studio in mind, doesn’t it? Why yes, in fact, I do. My friend Sophie has a little apartment – a whopping twice the size of my beloved studio, mind you – in the 14th arrondissement of Paris, not far from the Luxembourg Gardens, that she would like to rent out between July 7 and August 18 this year.

Well lit, recently renovated, and furnished (futon, coffee table, chair, sheets, towels, kitchen utensils), this charming studio is typically Parisian, with views of the City of Light’s rooftops and easy access to the metro as well as trains to Orly and Roissy.

Imagine walking down the pedestrian market-street Rue Daguerre in the 14th arrondissement. Visit the tower at Montparnasse and the museum dedicated to fabulous French photographer Henri-Cartier Bresson. Stop at a café around Place Denfert-Rochereau before a stroll through the Luxembourg Gardens. Just the thought makes me wish I could snap this little place up…

You don’t need much to keep you satisfied in Paris. Twenty square meters sounds about right.

The rent, including all charges, is 400 euros for one week, 700 euros for two weeks, 950 euros for three weeks, or 1150 euros for four weeks.

If you’re interested, let me know and I will put you in touch with Sophie!

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8 Comments

Filed under Adventure, Inspiration, Paris

8 responses to “Paris is calling. She says she booked your apartment in the 14th for this summer.

  1. If I weren’t already living in France, I would be envious. Bon vacances!
    -Léa

  2. Lindsey

    Love this post, Emily! What synchronicity – I just finished E.M. Forster’s novel Room with a View. The view was in Firenze, not Paris, but never mind! And the detail about the slightly slanted electric burners put me in mind of my own beloved tiny space, our sweet Wyoming cabin.

  3. That sounds delightful. If only I didn’t have houseguests already scheduled during the middle of that month. 😦

  4. I’ll be sure to pass the word around.

    (And thanks for sharing that lovely memory of home. Comment Dijon-Ville me manque!!!) Bisous

  5. Love this studio!
    But our trip to Paris is from July 3 to July 8(check out),5 nights.
    Is it available?
    PS:
    We are 2 people ^____^ (Peiling & William)
    from Taiwan (R.O.C)

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